Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/46962
Title: Introducing the Algerian Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Profiles into the North African Landscape
Authors: Bekada, Asmahan
Fregel, Rosa
Cabrera, Vicente M.
Larruga, José M.
Pestano, Jose 
Benhamamouch, Soraya
González, Ana M.
UNESCO Clasification: 32 Ciencias médicas
Keywords: High-Resolution Analysis
Mtdna Haplogroup-H
Sub-Saharan Africa
Near-Eastern
Genetic-Structure, et al
Issue Date: 2013
Journal: PLoS ONE 
Abstract: North Africa is considered a distinct geographic and ethnic entity within Africa. Although modern humans originated in this Continent, studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome genealogical markers provide evidence that the North African gene pool has been shaped by the back-migration of several Eurasian lineages in Paleolithic and Neolithic times. More recent influences from sub-Saharan Africa and Mediterranean Europe are also evident. The presence of East-West and North-South haplogroup frequency gradients strongly reinforces the genetic complexity of this region. However, this genetic scenario is beset with a notable gap, which is the lack of consistent information for Algeria, the largest country in the Maghreb. To fill this gap, we analyzed a sample of 240 unrelated subjects from a northwest Algeria cosmopolitan population using mtDNA sequences and Y-chromosome biallelic polymorphisms, focusing on the fine dissection of haplogroups E and R, which are the most prevalent in North Africa and Europe respectively. The Eurasian component in Algeria reached 80% for mtDNA and 90% for Y-chromosome. However, within them, the North African genetic component for mtDNA (U6 and M1; 20%) is significantly smaller than the paternal (E-M81 and E-V65; 70%). The unexpected presence of the European-derived Y-chromosome lineages R-M412, R-S116, R-U152 and R-M529 in Algeria and the rest of the Maghreb could be the counterparts of the mtDNA H1, H3 and V subgroups, pointing to direct maritime contacts between the European and North African sides of the western Mediterranean. Female influx of sub-Saharan Africans into Algeria (20%) is also significantly greater than the male (10%). In spite of these sexual asymmetries, the Algerian uniparental profiles faithfully correlate between each other and with the geography.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/46962
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0056775
Source: PLoS ONE [EISSN 1932-6203], v. 8 (2), (Febrero 2013)
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