Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/74279
Title: Relative role of physical inactivity and snacking between meals in weight gain
Authors: Sánchez Villegas, Almudena 
Martínez-Gonzalez, Miguel Ángel
Toledo, Estefanía
de Irala, Jokin
Martínez, J. Alfredo
UNESCO Clasification: 3206 Ciencias de la nutrición
Issue Date: 2002
Journal: Medicina Clínica 
Abstract: Background: Diet and life-styles are considered as the main factors that determine the high prevalence of obesity in Western societies. Although some countries have registered a decrease in fat intake, the percentage of overweight and obesity has increased. Therefore, it is thought that fat intake may not be the main factor that determines the current epidemic of obesity. The objective of this study was to determine the role of a sedentary life-style and eating between meals (snacking) as major determinants of a recent weight change (over last 5 years). Method: By using cross-sectionally baseline data of the SUN cohort, we adjusted non-conditional logistic regression models to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of gaining weight according to age, physical activity in leisure time, watching television, taking a nap, smoking, snacking and the intake of macronutrients. Results: A statistically significant inverse association between leisure-time physical activity and the probability of gaining weight was found for men (OR = 0.93; CI 95%, 0.88-0.98) and a trend was also present among women. Snacking was positively associated with a higher probability of gaining weight among men (OR = 1.88; CI 95%, 1.40-2.53) and among women (OR = 1.38; CI 95%, 1.10-1.73). Conclusions: Our data suggest a direct association between snacking and weight gain in middle-aged people.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/74279
ISSN: 0025-7753
DOI: 10.1016/s0025-7753(02)73311-3
Source: Medicina clínica [ISSN 0025-7753], v. 119 (2), p. 46-52
URL: http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/articulo?codigo=2808443
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