Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/73303
Title: Adolescent motherhood in Mozambique. Consequences for pregnant women and newborns
Authors: Jaén-Sánchez, Nieves
González Azpeitia, Gloria 
Saavedra Santana, Pedro 
Saavedra Sanjuán, Esther
Manguiza, Aniceto Alberto
Manwere, Nicholas
Carranza-Rodriguez, Cristina
Pérez Arellano, José Luis 
Serra Majem, Luis 
UNESCO Clasification: 320108 Ginecología
Issue Date: 2020
Journal: PLoS ONE 
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: In sub-Saharan Mozambique, high adolescent fertility rates are a significant public health problem. Understanding the consequences of teenage pregnancies facilitates effective strategies for improving the quality of care of both mother and the newborn. AIMS: To identify the factors associated with adolescent motherhood in Tete (Mozambique). METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study including 821 pregnant women (255 teenagers) admitted to the general maternity ward of the Provincial Hospital between March and October 2016. The survey included clinical data of the mother and newborn. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of adolescent deliveries was 31.8% (95% CI 27.9% - 34.2%). Multivariate analysis showed that independent factors associated with teenage motherhood were: number of pregnancies (OR 0.066; 95% CI 0.040-0.110), pregnancy follow-up (OR 0.29; CI 0.173-0.488) and previous abortions (OR 4.419; 95% CI 1.931-10.112). When the age of the mother was analysed as a continuous variable, positively associated factors were body mass index, arterial hypertension, HIV infection, previous abortions, pregnancy follow-up, and the weight of the newborn. Negatively associated factors were episiotomy and respiratory distress in the newborn. CONCLUSION: Teenage motherhood is a serious public health problem in Mozambique. Intensive sexual and reproductive health planning for adolescents is needed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/73303
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0233985
Source: PloS one [EISSN 1932-6203], v. 15 (6), (Enero 2020)
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