Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/6562
Title: Cardiovascular responses to dynamic exercise with acute anemia in humans
Authors: Koskolou, Maria D.
Roach, Robert C.
Calbet, JAL 
Radegran, Goran
Saltin, Bengt
UNESCO Clasification: 241106 Fisiología del ejercicio
Keywords: Hypoxia
Exercise
Blood flow
Issue Date: 1997
Journal: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology 
Abstract: We hypothesized that reducing arterial O2 content (CaO2) by lowering the hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) would result in a higher blood flow, as observed with a low PO2, and maintenance of O2 delivery. Seven young healthy men were studied twice, at rest and during two-legged submaximal and peak dynamic knee extensor exercise in a control condition (mean control [Hb] 144 g/l) and after 1-1.5 liters of whole blood had been withdrawn and replaced with albumin [mean drop in [Hb] 29 g/l (range 19-38 g/l); low [Hb]]. Limb blood flow (LBF) was higher (P < 0.01) with low [Hb] during submaximal exercise (i.e., at 30 W, LBF was 2.5 +/- 0.1 and 3.0 +/- 0.1 l/min for control [Hb] and low [Hb], respectively; P < 0.01), resulting in a maintained O2 delivery and O2 uptake for a given workload. However, at peak exercise, LBF was unaltered (6.5 +/- 0.4 and 6.6 +/- 0.6 l/min for control [Hb] and low [Hb], respectively), which resulted in an 18% reduction in O2 delivery (P < 0.01). This occurred despite peak cardiac output in neither condition reaching >75% of maximal cardiac output (approximately 26 l/min). It is concluded that a low CaO2 induces an elevation in submaximal muscle blood flow and that O2 delivery to contracting muscles is tightly regulated.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/6562
ISSN: 0363-6135
Source: American Journal Of Physiology-Heart And Circulatory Physiology[ISSN 0363-6135],v. 273 (4), p. H1787-H1793
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