Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/50989
Title: Oxygen tension and content in the regulation of limb blood flow
Authors: Calbet, J. A.L. 
UNESCO Clasification: 241106 Fisiología del ejercicio
Keywords: cardiovascular physiology
exercise
hypoxia
vasoconstriction
vasodilation
Issue Date: 2000
Publisher: 0001-6772
Journal: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica 
Conference: Acta-Physiologica-Scandinavica International Symposium on Skeletal Muscle Oxygen Availability and Utilization
Abstract: During submaximal exercise, muscle blood flow increases when arterial oxygen content (CaO2) is reduced. The increase in blood flow is brought about by elevating cardiac output (CO) and enhancing leg vascular conductance. Conversely, increased CaO2 elicits lower limb blood flow (LBF) and CO. During maximal exercise, the influence of CaO2 on muscle blood flow is modulated depending on the amount of muscle mass recruited. When a small muscle mass is activated and the pumping capacity of the heart is not limited, changes in CaO2 barely influence the level of blood flow attained at peak exercise. However, when a large muscle mass is engaged in the exercise, as occurs for example during cycling and running, muscle blood flow is decreased if maximal CO is reduced, as happens during exercise in severe hypoxia. In contrast, maximal muscle blood flow and CO are maintained at peak exercise when CaO2 is increased. As such, exercise intensity, muscle mass and CaO2 appear to be the critical factors determining muscle blood flow during exercise.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/50989
ISSN: 0001-6772
DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-201X.2000.00698.x
Source: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica[ISSN 0001-6772],v. 168, p. 465-472
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