Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/49071
Title: Childhood underweight, weight gain during childhood to adolescence/young adulthood and incidence of adult metabolic syndrome in the SUN (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra) Project
Authors: Pimenta, Adriano M.
Beunza, Juan José
Sanchez-Villegas, Almudena 
Bes-Rastrollo, Maira
Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A.
UNESCO Clasification: 32 Ciencias médicas
3212 Salud pública
3206 Ciencias de la nutrición
Keywords: Impaired Glucose-Tolerance
Body-Mass Index
Consensus Statement
Blood-Pressure
Disease, et al
Issue Date: 2011
Project: Red Alimentación Saludable en la Prevención Primaria de Enfermedades Crónicas: la Red Predimed. (Retics 2006) 
Journal: Public Health Nutrition 
Abstract: Objective: To assess associations between childhood body weight, weight gain during childhood to adolescence/young adulthood and incidence of adult metabolic syndrome (MetS).Design: A dynamic prospective cohort study (the SUN Project; Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra). Participants were asked to select which of nine body images most closely represented their body shape at ages 5 and 20 years, and it was used as a proxy of BMI. An incident case of MetS was diagnosed according to criteria of the International Diabetes Federation. Associations between childhood body weight, weight gain during childhood to adolescence/young adulthood and incidence of adult MetS were estimated by multiple-adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals.Setting: University of Navarra, Spain.Subjects: The study included 5317 university graduates, followed-up for a median of 6.1 years.Results: The incidence of MetS was 2.9% (1.7% in women and 5.1% in men). Among men, body shape at age 5 years was inversely related to adult MetS (OR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.72, 0.97), whereas weight gain during childhood to adolescence/young adulthood was directly associated with adult MetS (OR = 1.49, 95% CI 1.01, 2.18); both childhood underweight (OR = 5.20, 95% CI 1.87, 14.50) and childhood obesity (OR = 4.66, 95% CI 1.40, 15.51) increased the likelihood of adult MetS. No association was apparent among women.Conclusions: These results support treating childhood underweight and weight gain during childhood to adolescence/young adulthood as part of comprehensive adult MetS prevention efforts in men.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/49071
ISSN: 1368-9800
DOI: 10.1017/S1368980010003009
Source: Public Health Nutrition[ISSN 1368-9800],v. 14, p. 1237-1244 (Julio 2011)
Appears in Collections:Artículos
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

8
checked on Jul 3, 2022

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

14
checked on Jul 3, 2022

Page view(s)

88
checked on Jun 4, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Share



Export metadata



Items in accedaCRIS are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.