Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/48343
Title: The hypertrophy of the lateral abdominal wall and quadratus lumborum is sport-specific: An MRI segmental study in professional tennis and soccer players
Authors: Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin 
Idoate, Fernando
Izquierdo, Mikel 
Calbet, Jose A. 
Dorado, Cecilia 
UNESCO Clasification: 241106 Fisiología del ejercicio
Keywords: Asymmetry
Muscle volume
Obliques abdominis
Transversus abdominis
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: 1476-3141
Journal: Sports Biomechanics 
Abstract: The aim was to determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of quadratus lumborum (QL), obliques, and transversus abdominis; the last two considered conjointly (OT), in tennis and soccer players. The volume of QL and OT was determined using magnetic resonance imaging in professional tennis and soccer players, and in non-active controls (n = 8, 14, and 6, respectively). In tennis players the hypertrophy of OT was limited to proximal segments (cephalic segments), while in soccer players it was similar along longitudinal axis. In tennis players the hypertrophy was asymmetric (18% greater volume in the non-dominant than in the dominant OT, p = 0.001), while in soccer players and controls both sides had similar volumes (p>0.05). In controls, the non-dominant QL was 15% greater than that of the dominant (p = 0.049). Tennis and soccer players had similar volumes in both sides of QL. Tennis alters the dominant-to-non-dominant balance in the muscle volume of the lateral abdominal wall. In tennis the hypertrophy is limited to proximal segments and is greater in the non-dominant side. Soccer, however, is associated to a symmetric hypertrophy of the lateral abdominal wall. Tennis and soccer elicit an asymmetric hypertrophy of QL.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/48343
ISSN: 1476-3141
DOI: 10.1080/14763141.2012.725087
Source: Sports Biomechanics[ISSN 1476-3141],v. 12, p. 54-67
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