Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/119940
Title: Socioeconomic and contextual determinants of the burden of disease attributable to metabolic risks in childhood
Authors: Vallejo Torres, Laura 
González Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz 
UNESCO Clasification: 531207 Sanidad
Keywords: Burden Of Disease
Childhood
Inequalities
Metabolic Risks
Women Empowerment
Issue Date: 2022
Journal: Frontiers in Public Health 
Abstract: We analyze the socioeconomic and political contextual determinants of the burden of disease attributable to three metabolic risks in children: kidney dysfunction, high fasting plasma glucose, and high body-mass index. We use data from 121 countries. We matched data of the Global Burden of Disease project, World Bank and United Nations databases. The burden of disease is measured with the Disability Adjusted Life Years lost. We explore associations with four groups of variables: (i) income level, which measures differences in socioeconomic conditions between countries; (ii) income inequality, which measures within country inequalities in the income distribution; (iii) health care expenditure, which measures the resources allocated to health and healthcare, and (iv) women empowerment, which we measure in terms of both educational and political participation. Our findings point toward the need to act at the root of the underlying factors underpinning the disease burden, namely: reducing between and, particularly, within-country income inequalities, increasing the role of expenditure on health, and ensuring women empowerment and girls education. To our knowledge, this is the first study that have identified the associations of these variables with the burden of disease that is specifically attributable to metabolic risks in childhood.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/119940
ISSN: 2296-2565
DOI: 10.3389/fpubh.2022.1003737
Source: Frontiers in Public Health [EISSN 2296-2565], v. 10, (Noviembre 2022)
Appears in Collections:Artículos
Adobe PDF (265,86 kB)
Show full item record

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Share



Export metadata



Items in accedaCRIS are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.