Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/46983
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGonzález, Ana M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLarruga, José M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbu-Amero, Khaled K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShi, Yufeien_US
dc.contributor.authorPestano, Joséen_US
dc.contributor.authorCabrera, Vicente M.en_US
dc.contributor.otherPestano Brito, Jose Juan-
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-23T09:55:18Z-
dc.date.available2018-11-23T09:55:18Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2164en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10553/46983-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The out of Africa hypothesis has gained generalized consensus. However, many specific questions remain unsettled. To know whether the two M and N macrohaplogroups that colonized Eurasia were already present in Africa before the exit is puzzling. It has been proposed that the east African clade M1 supports a single origin of haplogroup M in Africa. To test the validity of that hypothesis, the phylogeographic analysis of 13 complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences and 261 partial sequences belonging to haplogroup M1 was carried out.Results: The coalescence age of the African haplogroup M1 is younger than those for other M Asiatic clades. In contradiction to the hypothesis of an eastern Africa origin for modern human expansions out of Africa, the most ancestral M1 lineages have been found in Northwest Africa and in the Near East, instead of in East Africa. The M1 geographic distribution and the relative ages of its different subclades clearly correlate with those of haplogroup U6, for which an Eurasian ancestor has been demonstrated.Conclusion: This study provides evidence that M1, or its ancestor, had an Asiatic origin. The earliest M1 expansion into Africa occurred in northwestern instead of eastern areas; this early spread reached the Iberian Peninsula even affecting the Basques. The majority of the M1a lineages found outside and inside Africa had a more recent eastern Africa origin. Both western and eastern M1 lineages participated in the Neolithic colonization of the Sahara. The striking parallelism between subclade ages and geographic distribution of M1 and its North African U6 counterpart strongly reinforces this scenario. Finally, a relevant fraction of M1a lineages present today in the European Continent and nearby islands possibly had a Jewish instead of the commonly proposed Arab/Berber maternal ascendance.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Genomicsen_US
dc.sourceBMC Genomics,v. 8 (223)en_US
dc.subject32 Ciencias médicasen_US
dc.subject320102 Genética clínicaen_US
dc.subject.otherPleistocene Homo-Sapiensen_US
dc.subject.otherMtdna Control Regionen_US
dc.subject.otherArt. No. 26en_US
dc.subject.otherY-Chromosomeen_US
dc.subject.otherGenome Variationen_US
dc.subject.otherPhylogeographic Analysisen_US
dc.subject.otherSequence Variationen_US
dc.subject.otherHuman-Populationsen_US
dc.subject.otherMiddle Awashen_US
dc.subject.otherDna-Sequenceen_US
dc.titleMitochondrial lineage M1 traces an early human backflow to Africaen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/Articleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2164-8-223en_US
dc.identifier.scopus34547880441-
dc.identifier.isi000248702000001-
dcterms.isPartOfBmc Genomics
dcterms.sourceBmc Genomics[ISSN 1471-2164],v. 8
dc.contributor.authorscopusid57201470100-
dc.contributor.authorscopusid6603770287-
dc.contributor.authorscopusid6701912671-
dc.contributor.authorscopusid7404963081-
dc.contributor.authorscopusid56149756400-
dc.contributor.authorscopusid7005213750-
dc.identifier.issue223-
dc.relation.volume8en_US
dc.investigacionCiencias de la Saluden_US
dc.type2Artículoen_US
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000248702000001-
dc.contributor.daisngid968836-
dc.contributor.daisngid263261-
dc.contributor.daisngid564158-
dc.contributor.daisngid113791-
dc.contributor.daisngid5934630-
dc.contributor.daisngid709319-
dc.contributor.daisngid865329-
dc.contributor.daisngid307040-
dc.contributor.daisngid30326284-
dc.identifier.investigatorRIDA-9640-2017-
dc.description.numberofpages12en_US
dc.utils.revisionen_US
dc.contributor.wosstandardWOS:Gonzalez, AM-
dc.contributor.wosstandardWOS:Larruga, JM-
dc.contributor.wosstandardWOS:Abu-Amero, KK-
dc.contributor.wosstandardWOS:Shi, Y-
dc.contributor.wosstandardWOS:Pestano, J-
dc.contributor.wosstandardWOS:Cabrera, VM-
dc.date.coverdateJulio 2007en_US
dc.identifier.ulpgcen_US
dc.contributor.buulpgcBU-MEDen_US
dc.description.jcr4,18
dc.description.jcrqQ1
dc.description.scieSCIE
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextSin texto completo-
crisitem.author.deptGIR IUIBS: Medio Ambiente y Salud-
crisitem.author.deptIU de Investigaciones Biomédicas y Sanitarias-
crisitem.author.deptDepartamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Fisiología, Genética e Inmunología.-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0001-6454-4785-
crisitem.author.parentorgIU de Investigaciones Biomédicas y Sanitarias-
crisitem.author.fullNamePestano Brito, José Juan-
Appears in Collections:Artículos
Show simple item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

67
checked on Aug 14, 2022

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

62
checked on Aug 14, 2022

Page view(s)

22
checked on May 21, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Share



Export metadata



Items in accedaCRIS are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.