Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/45942
Title: Crystalloids and colloids in critical patient resuscitation
Authors: Garnacho-Montero, J.
Fernández-Mondéjar, E.
Ferrer-Roca, R.
Herrera-Gutiérrez, M. E.
Lorente, J. A.
Ruiz-Santana, S. 
Artigas, A.
Keywords: Hydroxyethyl Starch 130/0.4
Lactated Ringers Solution
Acutely Ill Patients
Acid-Base-Balance
Fluid Resuscitation
Severe Sepsis
Renal-Function
Double-Blind
0.9-Percent Saline
Metabolic-Acidosis
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: 0210-5691
Journal: Medicina Intensiva 
Abstract: Fluid resuscitation is essential for the survival of critically ill patients in shock, regardless of the origin of shock. A number of crystalloids and colloids (synthetic and natural) are currently available, and there is strong controversy regarding which type of fluid should be administered and the potential adverse effects associated with the use of these products, especially the development of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy. Recently, several clinical trials and nnetaanalyses have suggested the use of hydroxyethyl starch (130/0.4) to be associated with an increased risk of death and kidney failure, and data have been obtained showing clinical benefit with the use of crystalloids that contain a lesser concentration of sodium and chlorine than normal saline. This new information has increased uncertainty among clinicians regarding which type of fluid should be used. We therefore have conducted a review of the literature with a view to developing practical recommendations on the use of fluids in the resuscitation phase in critically ill adults. (C) 2015 Elsevier Espana, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/45942
ISSN: 0210-5691
DOI: 10.1016/j.medin.2014.12.007
Source: Medicina Intensiva[ISSN 0210-5691],v. 39, p. 303-315
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