Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10553/16730
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoppens, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorSerra-Majem, Lluisen_US
dc.contributor.authorDew, Tristanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-28T02:30:28Z-
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-15T14:36:29Z-
dc.date.available2016-04-28T02:30:28Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-15T14:36:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.issn2042-6496en_US
dc.identifier.otherScopus-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10553/16730-
dc.description.abstractWe assess the evidence for health benefits of three commonly consumed plant food supplements (PFS), green tea, isoflavone and aloe vera, based on published systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Whilst the potential benefits of green tea have been reported in a wide range of health areas, it is only in the area of the metabolic syndrome that the number of RCTs is approaching sufficient to judge such efficacy. Isoflavone supplements are widely used, and RCTs indicate that they affect bone resorption at lower doses in postmenopausal women undergoing estrogen-related bone loss, but this is only translated to attenuation of bone loss at higher doses of isoflavones. A systematic review on RCTs concluded that the effects of isoflavones on hot flashes in postmenopausal women were highly variable and no conclusions could be drawn. Despite the popularity of aloe vera as a PFS, the evaluation of its efficacy as a coadjuvant therapy for certain metabolic or digestive pathologies remains scarce; it constitutes a typical example of a naturally occurring ingredient whose efficacy in topical applications presupposes its efficacy in systemic applications. Nevertheless, its possible toxic effects on oral consumption call for caution in its utility as a PFS. Since 2007, efficacy evaluation of PFS in Europe has been covered by European Union Nutrition and Health Claims legislation. The European Food Safety Authority has adopted an approach relying on RCTs, while medicinal effects are accepted based on traditional use. In general, there are insufficient RCTs for claims to be made, and conclusive results on PFS should be obtained in the future by conducting studies with more homogeneous populations, by using supplements with optimised and measured bioavailability, and by conducting larger RCTs.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdf-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFood and Functionen_US
dc.rightsby-nc-nd-
dc.sourceFood & Function [ISSN 2042-6496], v. 2 (12), p. 753-9en_US
dc.subject3206 Ciencias de la nutriciónen_US
dc.subject.otherBone-Mineral Densityen_US
dc.subject.otherAntidiabetic Activityen_US
dc.subject.otherDiabetes-Mellitusen_US
dc.subject.otherSoy Isoflavonesen_US
dc.subject.otherBlood-Pressureen_US
dc.subject.otherMenopausal Womenen_US
dc.subject.otherClinical-Trialen_US
dc.subject.otherHealth Claimsen_US
dc.subject.otherDouble-Blinden_US
dc.subject.otherL Juiceen_US
dc.titleReview of the efficacy of green tea, isoflavones and aloe vera supplements based on randomised controlled trialsen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/reviewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1039/c1fo10101cen_US
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-82455206249-
dc.identifier.isi000297495900007-
dc.contributor.authorscopusid7202843276-
dc.contributor.authorscopusid7007058263-
dc.contributor.authorscopusid35596972100-
dc.contributor.authorscopusid8651693500-
dc.identifier.crisid-;-;2693;--
dc.identifier.eissn2042-650X-
dc.description.lastpage759en_US
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.description.firstpage753en_US
dc.relation.volume2en_US
dc.investigacionCiencias de la Saluden_US
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess-
dc.type2Reseñaen_US
dc.contributor.daisngid27243-
dc.contributor.daisngid2565249-
dc.contributor.daisngid28836-
dc.contributor.daisngid2196323-
dc.utils.revisionen_US
dc.contributor.wosstandardWOS:Williamson, G-
dc.contributor.wosstandardWOS:Coppens, P-
dc.contributor.wosstandardWOS:Serra-Majem, L-
dc.contributor.wosstandardWOS:Dew, T-
dc.date.coverdateDiciembre 2011en_US
dc.identifier.supplement-;-;2693;--
dc.identifier.ulpgces
dc.description.sjr0,347
dc.description.jcr1,179
dc.description.sjrqQ2
dc.description.jcrqQ2
dc.description.scieSCIE
item.fulltextCon texto completo-
item.grantfulltextopen-
crisitem.author.deptGIR IUIBS: Nutrición-
crisitem.author.deptIU de Investigaciones Biomédicas y Sanitarias-
crisitem.author.deptDepartamento de Ciencias Clínicas-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0002-9658-9061-
crisitem.author.parentorgIU de Investigaciones Biomédicas y Sanitarias-
crisitem.author.fullNameSerra Majem, Luis-
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